The Ultimate Car Quiz (Continued)

This car has had several facelifts through the years. When it launched in 1949, the vehicle had the highest trim levels with a straight-6 engine with 103hp. By 1968, the company offered a HEMI-powered 2-door hardtop/convertible version that packed 370hp and later 390hp.

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This car was manufactured between 1964 and 1974. It originally was based on the Valiant, but the second-generational it received a heavy redesign, and by the third generation, the car had an exclusive body. Though it started as a sort of fastback option for the Valiant, speed became the priority in later additions.




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This car sported the world’s first dual-rotor rotary engine and went into full production in 1967. Since each unit was handmade, only one car was manufactured per day. This vehicle is known for its styling, luxury, and performance. Many regard it as a Japanese classic.




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This car was pretty much a sales failure. It started as a performance package for the Comet but soon became its own thing. The company produced them from 1964 to 1971. Though a good racer, getting first and second in the 1968 Daytona 500, it never found a niche. The company also produced another popular pony car, the Cougar, that might have eaten into sales.




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This variation is all about performance. It was built around a Formula-S package for a specific model in 1969 and given a 6.3-liter V8 which raised it to 330hp.




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This was only offered in 1970. It was meant to be an entry-level bruiser like the Chevelle or Road Runner. The company only built 3,547 units of this car. They included a 350 engine and Super Stock II rally wheels.




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This car had an impressive 579,000 sales in its first year. The company envisioned it as a two-door sedan with a rear-wheel-drive platform. Production lasted from 1969-1977, with an optional 302 CID V8 introduced in 1971. The car remains popular, so much so, the company is putting a truck out with the same name in 2022.




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This car was produced between 1958 and 1972. It was one of the company’s cheaper full-size car ranges. In 1966, a version with an L72 427/425 HP big block engine was commissioned. The company only made 200, with one used as a drag racer for several years.




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This car was marketed as a personal luxury car from 1965 to 1967. The 1965 model has a 5.4L V8 producing 270hp. Not bad, given that this company did not have the same resources as some others at this time.




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This vehicle helped propagate the muscle car market in the 1960s. Some even credit the company for starting the craze of offering different competing models. These cars were manufactured from 1963 to 1974 and revived again from 2003 to 2006.




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This car was launched with the 1966 model. The vehicle featured 318 cu in, 361 cu in, 426 Hemi engines options, along with a three-speed manual, a four-speed manual, and Torqueflite automatic transmissions selection. Unfortunately the car sales went down in the late 60s. This vehicle, however, was brought back twice from 1975-1978, 1981–1987, and 2005 to the present. You can’t stop this powerhouse.




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The creator of this vehicle made custom cars. He liked the late model Corvair’s handling and got an SCCA approval of the 1966 Corsa model to race. He increased the horsepower and torque. He made 100 and painted them white along with blue stripes. These vehicles
can get 190hp.




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This car was released in 1967 and came with a 7.0-liter V-8 and a 4-speed transmission. The rating for this engine is 430hp, but it is capable of more. The factory only put in twenty of these engines. Because of their rarity, these cars are worth upwards of $3.95 million.




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This package was introduced in 1970. Along with V8 engine options, it had a 3-speed floor shift transmission, sports mirrors, chrome-tipped dual exhaust, Rally II Wheels, white letter tires, and vinyl accents stripes. The package the following year came with almost the same things, along with a couple of revisions.




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This car was only produced in 1971. It had a four-speed Toploader with a floor-mounted, T-handle Hurst shifter. The engine was capable of 330hp with 380lb-ft of torque. It was capable of going from 0-60 in 5.8 seconds.




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This vehicle acquired its title from a 1953 concept car, though it did not hit the market until 1962. Unfortunately, this beast only lasted two generations, with the last model releasing in 1970. Ultimately federal regulations, including safety equipment, made a less than ideal economic situation for these cars, and the company decided to pull the plug.




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This vehicle replaced the Ventura with a focus on performance. Obviously, this car has a following considering the manufacturer worked on these from 1962 to 2008, with models dramatically changing sizes. Sadly, the company dissolved in 2009.




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This car was launched five years following the company’s letter series shut down. The goal was to provide performance but not compromise on luxury. One thing you can probably tell from the picture is this vehicle is long. In fact, it’s one of the longest muscle cars ever made.




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This car had a short life, with it lasting only a year. The idea behind this vehicle was to have a high-performance car with four passengers. After the company’s factory closed, it cut the life of this car short despite positive reception and sales. Eventually, two dealers in South Bend, Indiana, picked up the name and resurrected production. They even made a concept for a sequel.




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How this got named Motor Trend’s 1974 Car of the Year, we will never know. It was actually based on a Pinto platform and came with a severely underpowered engine compared to its predecessor. The vehicle was also a lot smaller. Despite the fan’s gripes, the marketing must have been good because the company sold over 1.1 million units.




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